Adventure in Prince Regent Inlet | Tecla

Adventure in Prince Regent Inlet

Stronger Northerly winds keep us at the North end of Prince Regent Inlet. Port Bowen has proven to be an excellent anchorage in these conditions. As described yesterday Sir W.E. Parry spent the winter of 1824/25 here. The following summer his party was forced to retread due to the bad ice conditions. They had been driven ashore with both Hecla and Fury. Fury was in a bad and un-seaworthy state and needed to be repaired. 

A cove of some sort was found at wat is called Fury Beach now. It is at the South East side of Somerset Island. Two big sheets of ice where stranded on the beach and provided some shelter from the ice flows passing by at alarming speed. A desperate attempt was made at repairing the Fury with Hecla at a safe distance. After several days the stranded ice flows got damaged by the constant onslaught of the ice flows. The difficult decision was made to leave the Fury and part of here supplies there and retreat out of immediate danger. A safe anchorage was found at Neill’s Harbor. I gave a short description on its geological benefits to the mariner and think this would be a good option for our stop tomorrow. Plenty of sites to explore. A young seaman who fell ill on Parry’s voyage past away here. There was a simple ceremony and a burial. It might be a good idea to have a look for the burial ground and pay our respects! 

The winds will stay strong over the next couple of days. Looking at the ice charts there is still one obstacle after Bellot Strait once we are in Peel Sound. A large mass of ice is packed at Ross Strait and seems to be impenetrable. However the winds will scatter this and push it further South. If we would be ready at Bellot Strait by Tuesday we could have a good chance passing this dense concentration of ice without to much drama. If we would make a run for it now, we would chance getting stuck between a rock and a hard place… If the ice pressure builds up with these winds it might not be so comfortable. So let’s take in the sights and keep our eye on the wind and ice!